An Expert's Take on an EHS Manager

An Expert's Take on an EHS Manager

Ajoy Gonsalves
Ajoy Gonsalves

You may have heard the term EHS manager before, but what exactly does this title entail? The exact responsibilities of an EHS manager will vary depending on the company and industry they work in, but there are a few key tasks that are always part of the job. Here's a closer look at what an EHS manager does and why this position is so important.

  1. What Does an EHS Manager Do?
  2. The Role of an EHS Managers
  3. Why Is an Environmental Health and Safety Manager Important?
  4. The Benefits of Having an EHS Manager
  5. How to Become an EHS Manager?
  6. What are the Certifications for EHS Managers?
  7. What is the Career Path of an EHS Manager?
  8. Health and Safety Programs
  9. Conclusion

What Does an EHS Manager Do?

An EHS manager is responsible for ensuring that their company complies with all environmental, health, and safety regulations. This includes developing and implementing policies and procedures, conducting audits and investigations, overseeing training programs, and more. In some cases, the EHS manager may also be responsible for overseeing the company's sustainability efforts.

The Role of an EHS Managers

The EHS manager also works closely with other departments within the company to ensure compliance with all local, state, and federal regulations. For example, if there is a new regulation that affects the way in which hazardous waste is disposed of, the EHS manager would work with the facility's operations department to develop a plan for compliance. 

In addition to their regulatory responsibilities, EHS managers are also responsible for developing and managing programs that improve employee health and wellness. For instance, an EHS manager might develop a smoking cessation program or a wellness program that encourages employees to eat healthy foods and get regular exercise. 

Why Is an Environmental Health and Safety Manager Important?

An EHS manager is vital to any company that wants to operate safely and responsibly. By ensuring that their company complies with all relevant regulations, an EHS manager helps to protect both the company's employees and the environment. In some industries, an EHS manager may also be responsible for preventing or mitigating liability risks.

The Benefits of Having an EHS Manager

An effective EHS manager can save your company money by reducing injuries, incidents, and accidents. They can also help to improve employee morale by creating programs that promote employee health and wellness. Moreover, an experienced EHS manager can help your company avoid costly fines by ensuring compliance with all local, state, and federal regulations. 

How to Become an EHS Manager?

There are a few key steps that you can take to become an Environmental Health and Safety Manager:

1. Obtain a degree in environmental science, health and safety, or a related field.

2. Gain experience working in a related field, such as health and safety, environmental compliance, or risk management.

3. Become certified in environmental health and safety (such as through the Board of Certified Safety Professionals).

4. Join professional organizations such as the American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE) or the National Environmental Health Association (NEHA).

5. Start building your professional network, and seek out opportunities to improve your skills and knowledge through continuing education programs and conferences.

6. Consider pursuing a management or executive role in order to gain additional experience leading teams and projects within the EHS field.

With the right combination of education, experience, and skills, you can become an effective Environmental Health and Safety Manager and help your company stay safe, compliant, and sustainable.

What are the Certifications for EHS Managers?

The six steps listed above are a great starting point for anyone looking to become an Environmental Health and Safety Manager, but there are a few additional certifications that can be helpful in this career field. Some of the most common certifications for EHS managers include:

1. Certified Industrial Hygienist (CIH)

2. Certified Hazardous Materials Manager (CHMM)

3. Certified Safety Professional (CSP)

4. Professional Engineer (PE)

5. Global International Health and Safety Manager (GIHSM)

Each of these certifications offers its own unique set of skills and knowledge that can be valuable in an EHS manager role. For instance, the CIH certification is focused on identifying and controlling workplace hazards, while the CHMM certification covers hazardous waste management. The CSP credential focuses on safety program management, and the PE certification allows professionals to specialize in environmental engineering.

If you're interested in pursuing one or more of these certifications, be sure to research the requirements and eligibility criteria carefully. Many of these certifications require a combination of education, experience, and/or exams in order to qualify.

What is the Career Path of an EHS Manager?

The career path of an Environmental Health and Safety Manager can be very rewarding. In addition to a strong salary and benefits package, EHS managers can enjoy a variety of job duties and responsibilities. Some common job titles held by EHS managers include:

1. Health and Safety Manager

2. Environmental Health and Safety Manager

3. Occupational Health and Safety Manager

4. Health and Safety Specialist

5. Environmental Compliance Manager

6. Risk Manager

7. Process Engineer

8. Project Manager

Each of these roles offers its own unique set of challenges and opportunities. By pursuing a career in environmental health and safety, you can enjoy a variety of interesting and exciting job opportunities in a wide range of industries.

Health and Safety Programs

Environmental health and safety (EHS) programs are vital for ensuring the safety of employees in the workplace. These programs can include anything from health and safety training to hazardous material management. In order to create an effective EHS program, it's important to understand the regulations that apply to your business and how to comply with them.

If you're looking to create or improve an EHS program for your company, be sure to seek out professional assistance. There are a number of organizations that offer consulting and training services specifically for EHS programs. By working with an experienced consultant, you can ensure that your program is compliant with all applicable regulations and tailored to meet the needs of your business.

Conclusion

If you're wondering what an EHS manager does, the answer is quite a lot! An EHS manager is responsible for making sure their company is compliant with all environmental, health, and safety regulations. This important role helps to protect both employees and the environment.